Lot

The department of the Batch is a French department of the Midday-Pyrenees area which draws its name from the Lot river. It is sometimes calls '' ground of the Wonders '' because of its sites, frames or landscape, exceptional. INSEE and the Post office allot code 46 to him.

History

The department was creates with the French Revolution, on March 4, 1790 pursuant to the law of December 22, 1789, from the province of Quercy, belonging to the government of Guyenne. It was then much wider than today towards the south, including the town of Montauban in particular, but was cuts down by approximately a quarter of its surface at the time of the creation of the department of Tarn-et-Garonne in 1808.

Tourism

The Batch saw tourist activity essentially. The caves and pits are numerous there, with often parietal paintings. One finds for example the cave of Pech-Blackbird has Cabrerets and the pit of Padirac (400 000 visitors).

The south-west of the department (the valley of the Batch) is one of the oldest wine-producing areas of France. The wines of Cahors are known in the whole world.

Autoire, Loubressac, Saint-Cirq-Lapopie as Carennac were classes among the most beautiful villages of France. Rocamadour (1 million visitors) is the second site more visit of province after the Saint-Michel mount, which is the third site more visit of France after the Eiffel Tower and the castle of Versailles; but Rocamadour profits fortunately from the success of its advertising slogan of post-war period.

Create in 1999, the Regional natural park of Causses of Quercy (175 717 hectares: 26.000 inhabitants) contributes has to preserve the local inheritance. The local flora and the European wildlife are presentees with the animalist Park of Gramat. With its virgin night sky of any luminous pollution, the famous black triangle of Quercy is a particularly privileged place of observation which has accomodated for a few years astronomical tourism growing.

Figeac shelters the Champollion museum and a giant reproduction of the stone of Rivet washer, decryptee by this native, one of the founders of modern Egyptology and Souillac, the Museum of the Automat and Robotics.

Source: Wikipedia.

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