Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut

On both sides bordering Fécamp to the sea arose once two chapels of the Holy Virgin, similar to Angels engaged in the custody of the city or headlights to illuminate the entrance to the port. One was called Notre-Dame-de-Grâce; the other, Notre-Dame-de-Salut. The first was located on the coast, to the West, near the farm of Alistair; It remains today stone on stone, and its existence is known only by tradition, maps and deeds.

The second chapel, still famous today, is located on the striking de Fécamp, also called Cape smile face and known interchangeably in the history under the Priory of Notre-Dame du Fort Beaudouin and Notre-Dame de Beaudouin of the village names.

This sanctuary of peace and salvation was placed on the theatre of war and death. Everyone knows that this rock, which means more than the sound of the wave against the pitfall, sounds once the smash arms and cries of the combatants. Wind from the sea, which stirred more than the Thistle on the ruins, once well waved Spears, fit well floating banners and well deployed and banners. Here every blade of grass covers a wall; each fallen stone is the debris of a tower. Look around you see long chains of pits which remparent Hill on the side of the Valley. Towards the plain, deep ditches, large cuts are intended to isolate the fortified. These walls were beaten by good storms, the hand of time is dwelt many times on the crest of these pits, many stones have rolled into these deep moat. Oh well! Despite this these pits have not less than 40 to 45 meters wide on 20 to 30 metres of depth. A jumper is still standing to the East of the Chapel, as if he was trying to see what enemies come forward in the plain.

It was a touching thought but to place well within the dangers and death, the sanctuary of salvation and life. Notice that all this power unit that seemed to ensure the strong Beaudouin an eternal existence, it remains more than the humble chapel that reigns in peace on the debris of the towers, much like the hermit of Vesuvius crowd walking cities reversed by the volcanic eruption which always saves his home.

These walls remained standing towards the sea, in relying on foothills, as old men on sticks, these are the remains of the Priory the protection of Notre-Dame has saved from the ravages of war. But if the Blessed Virgin has protected once against the wrath of men, since they have protected it often against storms and the sea winds.

The origin of this Chapel is lost probably in the mists of time, but in the absence of historical records, we will quote a tradition that we know since our childhood.

It tells that a Duke of Normandy is about to sinking, made wish if he escaped the danger, to build three chapels to the Virgin Mary on the shores of the sea. Saved by a miracle, he built one of our Lady of deliverance near Caen, that of our Lady of Grace in Honfleur, and finally that of Notre-Dame de Salut in Fécamp.

The chapel of Chantereine in Cherbourg is due to a similar event. We noted that the coastline of Normandy is virtually lined with chapels to the Virgin Mary. There are as many as ports and as well as pitfalls. Dieppe, it is our Lady of strikes; at Saint-Vallery, Notre Dame de Bon Port. at the Grand' Valley, Notre-Dame de Janville. in Fécamp, our Lady of salvation; at the entrance of the Seine, Notre Dame de Grace; the past of Villequier, Notre-Dame de Barre_ y va; on the rocks of the Calvados, Notre-Dame of deliverance; Finally between cap de la Hague and the promontory of la Hougue, is Chantereine. All these chapels were for our old sailors as many stars overnight, as many lighthouses in the storm.

That of Fécamp was more than a simple Chapel, it was a Priory in title, whose name is equivalent to every moment in the chapter deliberations of the Abbey.

Enter the Chapel to cross mysterious corridors, real sacred labyrinths made with the crumbling walls of the old fort and the ancient Church. Of the entrance, we see in the wall of the capitals in the 13th century, which made me rise to the thought that the species atrium or peristyle that above the Chapel, is the former nave ruined by war or by storms (found proof of the existence of a nave the chapel of Notre-Dame in the chapter deliberations of 29 August 1669. Archives Départementales).

This aître is just filled with Holy debris, they are Flint collapsed, drums of columns, mouldings, gravestones, statue fragments, etc. To the North is a round pink which would overcome the portal. Inside collateral are the posts and capitals drowned in masonry, but nowhere the 13th century is more apparent than in the arcade capped by coarse veneer of the portal.

The exterior of the Chapel is well miserable, there's more than a chorus and a Bell Tower, yet the tower is no longer a stretch made of parts and pieces. Originally it must have be a square Tower tuffeuse stone breakthrough novels hangers. Two windows remaining, reveal the 11th century. A slate roof, very down, covers this old Chief both outraged by the years.

The choir, eroded by time, is supported by some foothills of the 13th century. At the end he is terminated by two three-mullioned windows with Tori and round roses containing roses to five leaves in the style of the 14th century.

A sacristy built in 1669 mask these beautiful windows.

All openings of the choir are 13th century warheads dwarfed in the 14th. One of those on the north side has a filling of the 16th.

On entering the Church left stands a chapel of our Lady of Sorrows, addition of the 16th century, recognizable with vaults and well battered flames of the window.

The vault of the bell tower no longer exists, but the 13th century arches which support the tower are very curious. The choir, vaulted to several Tori, a capitals polygons which are slightly open buttons. This is obviously the end of the 13th century and the beginning of the 14th (1290).

The Arch of the portal which should be the nave also has buttons entr' open under an octagonal plinth. The North arcade presents United capitals as I saw the Cathedral of Rennes and Saint-Nicolas de Blois, buildings from the 13th century.

Under the walls of this tower a crowd of visitors have written their names. Surely, these are the most devout pilgrims, nor travellers are best learned; because nothing is more disgusting to see these walls covered as a cabaret. These names prove without doubt that this Chapel is busy, but they also prove that this is not always the religion which leads there. We love the piety that covers the walls of the ex-votos of recognition, but we hate the vain glory which defiles his contact as the insect with his presence. We are certainly not friends of whitewash, however we call all our greeting the restorative layer that should disappear this dirty nomenclature.

What we has enjoyed in this Chamber, it is a humble prayer left there on September 16, 1842, by a pious traveller, who had time to the pencil. Here are a few stanzas addressed to Mary:

Sur les bords de la mer, comme aux bords de la Seine,
Étendez votre empire, étonnez tous les yeux.
Prouvez a tous les cœurs que vous êtes la Reine
Du monde et des esprits, de la terre et des cieux.

Du marin qui vous prie exaucez la prière,
Sauvez-le des écueils et des dangers lointains,
Que l'épouse à l'époux, et le fils à la mère
Soient toujours ramenés et conduits par vos soins.

 

The choir, which is itself the chapel consists of three pretty compartments of vaults, including the background has five arches. The fallout from these vaults relies on beams of balusters, whose main has a marquee of three rows of demi-ouverts buttons. This work obviously is the transition between the 13th and the 14th century. I say the same thing about pretty windows whose capitals are already fulfilled.

To the North is a window composed only of United Tori and whose filling is of the 15th century. On the bottom of this window it reads: Hommage à Marie, 17 September 1832.

The marble altar, fruit of the liberality of the faithful, is surmounted by a contre-table style Louis XIII. It is reminiscent of Sainte-ELL d'Auray in Morbihan. It is abundantly decorated with a deluge of flowers, fruit and garlands. In the middle is a Virgin with the child Jesus, two statues accompany it placed on each pediment of the contre-table. On one side is a painting of an Annunciation; It is the 25th of March that this Chapel is visited by all the inhabitants of the countryside. That day, all roads that lead to Fécamp are covered with pilgrims, that one sees then procession climb the Hill. The bridegroom usually leads his fiancée, and it is rare that a marriage is celebrated in the vicinity unless it has been preceded by a pilgrimage to our Lady of March.

The other table is the Rosary given by the child Jesus to St. Dominic and St. Francis of Assisi. Angels surround the Queen of heaven and him then present wreaths that she throws with both hands on the Earth; ingenious symbol of the abundant graces she spreads on the children of men.

A large number of ex-voto lining this Chapel: these are paintings, ships in relief ships, vases with flowers and flowers images; all attest to the power of Marie and piety of his servants.

The trail that leads to the Chapel is rough and difficult: however to see the day and the night of poor people climb up to his knees. It is a mostly point where meet several stones markets on which it is said that an Angel has passed; encrusted crosses keep for piety footprint its not: also the man of the people whose faith is strong, hastens up to their knees this Holy scale, respectfully fucking each of the degrees on which he walks.

Marin especially is devout to this Chapel; He loves her when he sees him breast of the seas, drosse it by the currents of the channel. It then appears to him as a guardian angel that guide its market and supports his courage. He likes it when he went to Newfoundland or the distant seas: it doesn't leave the shore without him say a touching farewell, and as far as he sees it, he welcome it as the announcement of the homeland. Before leaving, whole crews there hear the mass Veni Creator preceded and followed by the litany. It is a touching thing that see prostrate these poor sailors who will wander in the adventure, seeking the sea track of fish which only God knows the road. They ask, kneeling, at Holy Spirit, inspire their masters and show them the finger instead where you throw the net. They cater to the star of the sea so that it directs them on his empire and they conjure the, by these ships hanging from the vaults and these sinking tables lining the walls, do not shorten in their favor the power of his arm.

But never this Chapel only appears more beautiful in the eyes of the sailor when it reverts to the port on the basis of a vow made in the storm. I will always remember seeing enter in Fécamp, in 1834, a large boat returning from fishing for herring in the North Sea. Hurricane had thrown it on the banks of the Netherlands, the crew was attached with a rope at the foot of the mast, and for several hours the waves had taken the ship leaned on its flanks broken. In this State, they had made a vow, and upon arrival they hurried to accomplish it. Need to see them, these poor sailors, as they descended to the ground in silence; then, without looking at their family, they dropped the eyes, put under their arm tarred hats, took hand their shoe and went barefoot the large side of the Virgin. And their women and their children followed by pouring tears and pushing sighs interspersed with tears, because they understand how much they had suffered. They read in their pale faces, into their eyes bathed with tears and into their deep silence, that it was victims that Marie had torn from the arms of death.

Source: The churches of the arrondissement of le Havre by Jean Benoit Désiré Cochet 1845.

Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut
(Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp)


Heritage listed, historical monument, or having been under investigation

Structural information

Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, On both sides bordering Fécamp to the sea arose once two chapels of the Holy Virgin, similar to Angels engaged in the custody of the city or headlights to illuminate the entrance to the port. One was called Notre-Dame-de-Grâce; the other, Notre-Dame-de-Salut. The first was located on the coast, to the West, near the farm of Alistair; It remains today stone on stone, and its existence is known only by tradition, maps and deeds. fecamp, seine maritime

Location and general information

  • identifier : 123276
  • item : Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut
  • Location of the building :
    • Haute-Normandie
    • Seine-Maritime
    • Fécamp
  • INSEE code of the municipality : 76259
  • Zip code of the municipality : 76400
  • Order in the communal list : 2
  • Name of the building :
    • The building is designated as follows : chapel
  • State :
    • the current state of the monument is not known.

Dates and times

  • Period of construction : 2 different epochs of evolution of the building.
    • 13th century
    • 18th century
  • Record Type : site classé
  • Date of protection : 1929/01/15 : inscrit MH
  • Date taken into account : 1993/09/15

Construction, architecture and style

  • Materials:
    • We do not have this information.
  • Roofing :
    • We do not have this information.
  • Materials (roofing) :
    • We do not have this information.
  • Other about the composition roofs :
    • No information on the coverage of the place.
  • Floors :
    • any information about this construction.
  • Stairs :
    • No stairs mentioned on this construction.
  • Decoration of the building :
    • No information about decoration.
  • Representation :
    • No information on the ornamentation of the place.
  • Typology :
    • No information about typology.
  • Plan :
    • We do not know the type of plan for this building.

Monument and history of the place

  • Interest of the building : Site classé 27 07 1928 (arrêté).
  • Elements protected MH (historical monument) :
    • Any particular element of the building is subject to protection in our database.
  • Constituent areas :
    • no information.
  • Parties constituantes étudiées :
    • no information.
  • Use :
    • We do not know the different uses that have been made of this construction.

Other

  • Other :
    • other Information : owned by the 1992 municipality
  • Picture : 6eeeedeb53f1ff5f927e0ba7391cfb76.jpg
  • Details : Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut : inscription par arrêté du 15 janvier 1929
  • Mérimée reference : PA00100657

Contributions documentaries made by visitors

Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of gérald krafft
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Contact contributor with his mail for more information.

Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of gérald krafft
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of gérald krafft
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Contact contributor with his mail for more information.

Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut. Picture of Pascal-Jean Rebillat Photographies
Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Salut, fecamp

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